Security+ (SY0-601) Cram Notes

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1. Network Security

EAP (Extensible Authentication Protocol): It is a framework for transporting authentication protocols. EAP defines the format of the messages. It uses four types of packets : request, response, success and failure. Request packets are issued by authenticator and ask for response packet from supplicant. If authentication is successful, a succes packet is sent to the supplicant is not a failure packet is sent.

PEAP (Protected EAP): It is designed to simplify deployment of 802.1x by using MS Windows logins and passwords. It is considered more secure than EAP because it creates an encrypted channel between client and authentication server and the channel then protects further authentication exchanges.

LEAP (Lightweight EAP): It is developed by Cisco Systems. It requires mutual authentication used for WLAN encryption using Cisco client software. There is no native support for LEAP in MS Windows operating system

MAC Filtering

  • Every Wi-Fi device is assigned a MAC (Media Access Control) address, a unique 12-digit hexadecimal identifier issued by the IEEE, the standards body that developed the Wi-Fi protocol. The MAC address is "hard-coded" in to the device and sent automatically to a Wi-Fi access point when the device tries to connect to the network.

  • Using the access point configuration software, you can create a safe list of allowed client devices or a black list of banned devices. If MAC filtering is activated, regardless of what encryption security is in place, the AP only allows devices on the safe list to connect, or blocks all devices on the black list – irrespective of encryption used.

  • Encryption protocols like WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access 2), reduced the necessity for using MAC filtering. Hackers may break in to MAC filtering device by sniffing addresses of connected devices and then spoofing or masquerading as one of them.

  • To enable MAC address filtering and to allow the devices with matching MAC addresses, perform these steps (these steps are generic in nature, and likely to change from one device type to another):

    • Step 1: Access the router's web-based setup page.

    • Step 2: When the router's web-based setup page appears, click Wireless, look for MAC address filtering tab.

    • Step 3: Enter the MAC addresses of the devices that are allowed to use the wireless network in the table provided.

    • Step 4: Click on Save Settings

TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol): It is an Encryption protocol used with WEP and WPA. Key size is 128 bits.

CCMP (Counter Mode with Cipher Block Chaining Message Authentication Code Protocol): It is an Encryption protocol used with WPA2. It addresses the vulnerabilities of TKIP and meets requirements of IEEE 802.11i. It uses 128 bit Key.

SSID (Service Set Identifier)

  • One way to secure your wireless network is to disable the SSID broadcast. This procedure prevents other users from detecting your SSID or your wireless network name when they attempt to view available wireless networks in your area.

  • To disable SSID Broadcast, perform these steps (these steps are generic in nature, and likely to change from one device type to another):

    • Step 1: Access the router's web-based setup page.

    • Step 2: When the router's web-based setup page appears, click Wireless, look for Wireless SSID Broadcast, and select Disable.

    • Step 3: Click on Save Settings

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